Anti-corruption efforts stagnating in G7 countries

More than two-thirds of countries – along with many of the world’s most advanced economies – are stagnating or showing signs of backsliding in their anti-corruption efforts, according to the 2019 Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI) released recently by Transparency International, the global coalition fighting against corruption.

Research shows several of the most advanced economies cannot afford to be complacent if they are to keep up their anti-corruption momentum. Four G7 countries score lower than last year: Canada, France, the UK and the US. Germany and Japan have seen no improvement, while Italy gained one point.

The top countries are New Zealand and Denmark, with scores of 87 each, followed by Finland, Singapore, Sweden and Switzerland. The bottom countries are Somalia, South Sudan and Syria. These countries are closely followed by Yemen, Venezuela, Sudan, Equatorial Guinea and Afghanistan.

Countries in which elections and political party financing are open to undue influence from vested interests are less able to combat corruption, analysis of the results finds. Countries that perform well on the CPI also have stronger enforcement of campaign finance regulations and broader range of political consultation.

“Frustration with government corruption and lack of trust in institutions speaks to a need for greater political integrity,” said Delia Ferreira Rubio, Chair of Transparency International. “Governments must urgently address the corrupting role of big money in political party financing and the undue influence it exerts on our political systems.”

Corruption still a serious problem in Asia

Many countries see economic openness as a way forward, however, governments across the region continue to restrict participation in public affairs, silence dissenting voices and keep decision-making out of public scrutiny.

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