Customs, ports urged to maintain flow of critical goods during pandemic

Trade by sea must continue to flow to maintain the continued provision of essential goods.

Trade by sea must continue to flow to maintain the continued provision of essential goods, including vital medical supplies, during the unprecedented global crisis arising from the COVID-19 pandemic.  Lee Kok Leong, executive editor, Maritime Fairtrade, reports

Customs administrations and port state authorities must continue to facilitate the cross-border movement of vital medical supplies and equipment, critical agricultural products, and other goods, to help minimize the overall impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on economies and societies, said the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and World Customs Organization (WCO).

IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim and WCO Secretary General Dr. Kunio Mikuriya strongly urged customs administrations and port state authorities, together with all other concerned agencies, to establish a coordinated and proactive approach to maintaining the integrity of the global supply chain so that the flow of vital goods by sea is not unnecessarily disrupted.  

The joint statement notes that ports are being closed and ships denied entry, as travel is curtailed and borders closed to slow the spread of the disease and mitigate its impacts.  Such restrictions, it says, may interrupt much-needed aid and technical support, and have negative social and economic effects on the countries concerned.  

It is critical that customs administrations and port state authorities continue to facilitate the cross-border movement of vital medical supplies and equipment, critical agricultural products, and other goods, to help minimize the overall impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on economies and societies. 

The two organizations emphasized the utmost importance of communication, coordination and cooperation at both national and local levels, between ships, port facilities, customs administrations and other competent authorities.  Customs and port administrations are urged to work together to resolve disruptions to the global supply chain, to support the health and well-being of all people. 

The joint statement comes as the demand for and the movement of relief goods (such as supplies, medicines and medical equipment) across borders is increasing dramatically.  

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Lee Kok Leong

Lee Kok Leong

Kok Leong, executive editor, has overall editorial responsibility for the direction and focus of Maritime Fairtrade. He has two decades of working experiences, including holding senior regional roles in business-to-business (B2B) print and online publications. He enjoys his work as a journalist, and regards it as a calling.

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