Singapore inaugurates maritime security and response flotilla to strengthen security capabilities

In recent years, maritime security threats have grown in scale and complexity.

Chief of Navy Rear-Admiral Aaron Beng officiated at the inauguration ceremony of the Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN)’s Maritime and Security Response Flotilla (MSRF) at RSS Singapura – Changi Naval Base on 26 January.

In recent years, maritime security threats have grown in scale and complexity. Examples include sea robbery threats in the region, and intrusions into Singapore territorial waters. As part of the restructured Maritime Security Command, a new MSRF will be inaugurated.

The MSRF will be responsible to develop and operate calibrated capabilities to provide the Singapore government and Singapore Armed Forces (SAF) with more options to respond to maritime incidents. 

The capabilities raised by the MSRF will provide flexibility to meet the increased demands and a wider scope of maritime security operations, and offer greater persistence to protect Singapore’s territorial waters. The MSRF will form an important part of the restructured Maritime Security Command.

The MSRF will operate new purpose-built vessels from 2026. As a start, the flotilla will operate four Sentinel-class Maritime Security and Response Vessels (MSRVs). It will also operate two Maritime Security and Response Tugboats (MSRTs). In line with other international maritime security agencies, these vessels will all bear red “racing” stripes on their bow.

Commander of the MSRF, Lieutenant Colonel Lee Jun Meng, said, “The MSRF will strengthen Singapore’s ability to deal with maritime security threats that have grown in scale and complexity through the years. The additional capabilities will provide us with more flexibility and a wider range of responses, and allow us to be deployed for greater persistence to safeguard and protect Singapore’s territorial waters.”

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